Laugardagur 10.02.2018 - 00:46 - FB ummæli ()

Plato’s World Soul and Shakespeare Myth

© Gunnar Tómasson

9 February 2018

I. Definition of Plato’s World Soul

(Construction G.T.)

105113*

Three Values of π

(See 8 Feb., 2018)

28878 = The Same

20886 = The Other

Jacob’s Ladder

5015 = Eight Natural Notes Descending

5015 = Eight Natural Notes Ascending

The Zodiac

45319 = Twelve Houses**

105113

*The sum of 34 numerical values based on the tonal scale in Traditional Construction of the World Soul. (See p. 229, Plato´s Mathematical Imagination by Robert Brumbaugh.)

** Aquarius = 4956; Pisces = 3577; Aries = 2443; Taurus = 4611; Gemini = 2514; Cancer = 2589; Leo = 1392; Virgo = 3180; Libra = 1939; Scorpio = 4594; Sagittarius = 6729; Capricornus = 6795 = 45319

 

II. Edward Oxenford’s Imperfect Book

(Letter to Robert Cecil)

511378

 9205 = My very good brother,

11119 = yf my helthe hadd beene to my mynde

20978 = I wowlde have beene before this att the Coorte

16305 = as well to haue giuen yow thankes

15468 = for yowre presence at the hearinge

15274 = of my cause debated as to have moued her M

10054 = for her resolutione.

23461 = As for the matter, how muche I am behouldinge to yow

22506 = I neede not repeate but in all thankfulnes acknowlege,

13131 = for yow haue beene the moover &

14231 = onlye follower therofe for mee &

19082 = by yowre onlye meanes I have hetherto passed

13953 = the pykes of so many adversaries.

16856 = Now my desyre ys. Sythe them selues

15903 = whoo have opposed to her M ryghte

17295 = seeme satisfisde, that yow will make

7234 = the ende ansuerabel

22527 = to the rest of yowre moste friendlye procedinge.

12363 = For I am aduised, that I may passe

22634 = my Booke from her Magestie yf a warrant may be procured

21532 = to my Cosen Bacon and Seriant Harris to perfet yt.

25516 = Whiche beinge doone I know to whome formallye to thanke

16614 = but reallye they shalbe, and are from me, and myne,

23196 = to be sealed up in an aeternall remembran&e to yowreselfe.

18733 = And thus wishinge all happines to yow,

13574 = and sume fortunat meanes to me,

19549 = wherby I myght recognise soo diepe merites,

13775 = I take my leave this 7th of October

11101 = from my House at Hakney 1601.

 

15668 = Yowre most assured and louinge

4605 = Broother

7936 = Edward Oxenford

511378

III. Perfecting Edward Oxenford’s Book

(Construction G. T.)

511378

Deformed First Heire

(Venus and Adonis, 1593)

  9987 = TO THE RIGHT HONORABLE

20084 = Henrie Vvriothesley, Earle of Southampton,

8814 = and Baron of Titchfield.

21943 = Right Honourable, I know not how I shall offend

23463 = in dedicating my vnpolisht lines to your Lordship,

25442 = nor how the worlde vvill censure mee for choosing

25266 = so strong a proppe to support so vveake a burthen,

17161 = onelye if your Honour seeme but pleased,

13387 = I account my selfe highly praised,

18634 = and vowe to take aduantage of all idle houres,

23217 = till I haue honoured you vvith some grauer labour.

23437 = But if the first heire of my inuention proue deformed,

15796 = I shall be sorie it had so noble a god-father:

12970 = and neuer after eare so barren a land,

16690 = for feare it yeeld me still so bad a haruest,

17496 = l leaue it to your Honourable suruey,

18884 = and your Honor to your hearts content,

27199 = vvhich I wish may alvvaies answere your ovvne vvish,

17766 = and the vvorlds hopefull expectation.

11662 = Your Honors in all dutie,

9322 = William Shakespeare

Cosmic Time

25920 = Platonic Great Year

Transformation

 -6149 = Edward de Vere

7000 = Microcosmos – Man in God’s Image

World Soul…

105113 = Platonic World Soul

…Perfected at

    874 = 874 A.D., Settlement of Iceland

511378

IV. Ben Jonson’s Perfect Book

(Epigrammes, 1616)

969686

17752 = To The Great Example Of Honor And Vertve,

6625 = The Most Noble

15805 = William, Earle of Pembroke, L. Chamberlayne,

100 = &c. [c = 100 when combined with &]

 

3177 = My Lord.

28324 = While you cannot change your merit, I dare not change your title:

12370 = It was that made it, and not I.

17687 = Vnder which name, I here offer to your Lo:

17687 = the ripest of my studies, my Epigrammes;

19735 = which, though they carry danger in the sound,

16695 = doe not therefore seeke your shelter:

20228 = For, when I made them, I had nothing in my conscience,

17746 = to expressing of which I did need a cypher.

18345 = But, if I be falne into those times, wherein,

14205 = for the likenesse of vice, and facts,

21707 = euery one thinks anothers ill deeds obiected to him;

20514 = and that in their ignorant and guiltie mouthes,

26249 = the common voyce is (for their securitie) Beware the Poet,

23308 = confessing, therein, so much loue to their diseases,

18752 = as they would rather make a partie for them,

13719 = then be either rid, or told of them:

30864 = I must expect, at your Lo: hand, the protection of truth, and libertie,

24129 = while you are constant to your owne goodnesse.

26974 = In thankes whereof, I returne you the honor of leading forth

28945 = so many good, and great names as my verses mention on the better part)

18807 = to their remembrance with posteritie.

13576 = Amongst whom, if I haue praysed,

20608 = vnfortunately, any one, that doth not deserue;

29367 = or, if all answere not, in all numbers, the pictures I haue made of them:

23367 = I hope it will be forgiuen me, that they are no ill pieces,

15943 = though they be not like the persons.

19615 = But I foresee a neerer fate to my booke, then this:

26225 = that the vices therein will be own’d before the vertues

25729 = (though, there, I haue auoyded all particulars, as I haue done names)

19689 = and that some will be so readie to discredit me,

22557 = as they will haue the impudence to belye themselues.

25650 = For, if I meant them not, it is so. Nor, can I hope otherwise.

23198 = For, why should they remit any thing of their riot,

23216 = their pride, their selfe-loue, and other inherent graces,

31414 = to consider truth or vertue; but, with the trade of the world,

19671 = lend their long eares against men they loue not:

15713 = and hold their dear Mountebanke, or Iester,

19716 = in farre better condition, then all the studie,

12299 = or studiers of humanitie.

25583 = For such, I would rather know them by their visards,

19563 = still, then they should publish their faces,

18123 = at their perill, in my Theater, where Cato,

18224 = if he liu’d, might enter without scandall.

 

15499 = Your Lo: most faithfull honorer,

4692 = Ben. Ionson.

969686

V. Tyrant King – Stratfordian – Sweet Swan

(Construction G. T.)

48459

Norwegian King Harald the Fairhaired

6092 = Haraldr hárfagri – Iceland’s First Settlers were fleeing his Tyrannical Rule

Deformed First Heire of

William Shakespeare‘s Invention

-4000 = Dark Sword – Man-Beast

Baptismal Record

17252 = Gulielmus filius Johannes Shakspere

2602 = 26 April – 2nd month old-style

1564 = 1564 A.D.

Burial Record

10026 = Will Shakspere, gent.

2502 = 25 April

1616 = 1616 A.D.

Herald of New World

10805 = Sweet Swan of Avon

48459

III + IV + V = 511378 + 969686 + 48459 = 1529523

VI. To Draw no Envy (Shakespeare) on The Name,

Am I thus Ample to thy Booke, and Fame

(Ben Jonson, First Folio, 1623)

1529523

11150 = To the memory of my beloved,

5329 = The AVTHOR

10685 = Mr. William Shakespeare

867 = AND

9407 = what he hath left us.

 

17316 = To draw no envy (Shakespeare) on thy name,

13629 = Am I thus ample to thy Booke, and Fame:

20670 = While I confesse thy writings to be such,

19164 = As neither Man, nor Muse, can praise too much.

21369 = ‘Tis true, and all mens suffrage. But these wayes

20516 = Were not the paths I meant unto thy praise;

17686 = For seeliest Ignorance on these may light,

23213 = Which, when it sounds at best, but eccho’s right;

17565 = Or blinde Affection, which doth ne’re advance

19375 = The truth, but gropes, and urgeth all by chance;

18692 = Or crafty Malice, might pretend this praise,

19456 = And thinke to ruine, where it seem’d to raise.

18294 = These are, as some infamous Baud, or Whore,

23199 = Should praise a Matron: – What could hurt her more?

18170 = But thou art proofe against them, and indeed

16465 = Above th’ill fortune of them, or the need.

16324 = I, therefore, will begin. Soule of the Age!

20370 = The applause! delight! the wonder of our Stage!

18434 = My Shakespeare, rise! I will not lodge thee by

16611 = Chaucer or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lye

15597 = A little further, to make thee a roome:

17952 = Thou art a Moniment, without a tombe,

19673 = And art alive still, while thy Booke doth live,

19194 = And we have wits to read, and praise to give.

18259 = That I not mixe thee so, my braine excuses, –

22232 = I meane with great, but disproportion’d Muses;

19760 = For if I thought my judgement were of yeeres,

21584 = I should commit thee surely with thy peeres,

23104 = And tell, how farre thou didst our Lily out-shine,

19727 = Or sporting Kid, or Marlowes mighty line.

21016 = And though thou hadst small Latine, and lesse Greeke,

21296 = From thence to honour thee, I would not seeke

20635 = For names; but call forth thund’ring Æschilus,

14527 = Euripides, and Sophocles to us,

15939 = Paccuvius, Accius, him of Cordova dead,

15425 = To life againe, to heare thy Buskin tread

19665 = And shake a Stage: Or, when thy Sockes were on,

14842 = Leave thee alone for the comparison

18781 = Of all that insolent Greece or haughtie Rome

20033 = Sent forth, or since did from their ashes come.

21540 = Triumph, my Britaine, thou hast one to showe

18910 = To whom all Scenes of Europe homage owe.

14789 = He was not of an age, but for all time!

19879 = And all the Muses still were in their prime,

17867 = When, like Apollo, he came forth to warme

16143 = Our eares, or like a Mercury to charme!

19768 = Nature her selfe was proud of his designes,

18609 = And joy’d to weare the dressing of his lines!

22712 = Which were so richly spun, and woven so fit,

20715 = As, since, she will vouchsafe no other Wit.

16006 = The merry Greeke, tart Aristophanes,

22701 = Neat Terence, witty Plautus, now not please;

12944 = But antiquated, and deserted lye,

15906 = As they were not of Natures family.

17575 = Yet must I not give Nature all; Thy Art,

16885 = My gentle Shakespeare, must enjoy a part:

17709 = For though the Poets matter, Nature be,

16202 = His Art doth give the fashion. And, that he,

24373 = Who casts to write a living line, must sweat

18045 = (such as thine are) and strike the second heat

17403 = Upon the Muses anvile: turne the same,

19618 = (And himselfe with it) that he thinkes to frame;

16266 = Or, for the lawrell, he may gaine a scorne,

15633 = For a good Poet’s made, as well as borne.

21914 = And such wert thou. Looke how the fathers face

15715 = Lives in his issue, even so, the race

20651 = Of Shakespeares minde and manners brightly shines

17328 = In his well torned and true-filed lines:

15712 = In each of which, he seemes to shake a Lance,

14757 = As brandish’t at the eyes of Ignorance.

21616 = Sweet Swan of Avon! what a sight it were

17318 = To see thee in our waters yet appeare,

19678 = And make those flights upon the bankes of Thames,

14184 = That so did take Eliza and our James!

15161 = But stay, I see thee in the Hemisphere

14530 = Advanc’d, and made a Constellation there!

22500 = Shine forth, thou Starre of Poets, and with rage

19541 = Or influence, chide or cheere the drooping Stage;

24007 = Which, since thy flight frō hence, hath mourn’d like night,

18824 = And despaires day, but for thy Volumes light.

  4692 = BEN: IONSON

1529523

VII. To the Memory of my Beloved

(Ben Jonson, First Folio Ode)

37438

11150 = To the memory of my beloved,

5329 = The AVTHOR

10685 = Mr. William Shakespeare

867 = AND

9407 = what he hath left us.

37438

A

The Murder of Christopher Morley

37438

Hostess

5156 = Eleanor Bull

3003 = 30 May – 3rd month old-style

1593 = 1593 A.D.

Three Companions at slaying of

Beastly Christopher Morley

6429 = Ingram Frizer

6069 = Robert Poley

7470 = Nicholas Skeres

Coroner’s Inquest

(Non-Latin wrords)

4795 = le recknynge

3942 = nere the bed

Death by Own “Dagger“

-9838 = Christopher Morley

1000 = Light of the World, Incarnate

My Name is Will

4371 = Will I Am!

Will Un-Masked

-7936 = Edward Oxenford

11384 = Christopher Marlowe

37438

B

What he hath left us

Roman-Gnostic Myth

37438

Alpha

20087 = Magnus ab integro saeclorum nascitur ordo.*

7864 = Jesus Patibilis – The Passible Jesus¹

2487 = Anus – Seat of Man‘s Lower Emotions

Omega

7000 = Microcosmos – Man in God‘s Image

37438

* Virgil, Fourth Eclogue: The majestic roll of circling centuries begins anew.

***

Calculator for converting letters to cipher values is at:

http://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphersaga.htm

¹ The Gnostic concept of Jesus Patibilis

….Jesus is here the god with the mission of revelation to man, a more specialized hypostasis or emanation of the Messenger, whose mission was to the captive Light in general and preceded the creation of man.  That it is he who makes Adam eat from the Tree of Knowledge explains the Christian accusation that the Manichaeans equated Christ with the serpent in Paradise.  Of the content of this revelation, the doctrine concerning „his own self cast into all things“ requires comment. It expresses the other aspect of this divine figure: in addition to being the source of all revelatory activity in the history of mankind, he is the personification of all the Light mixed into matter; that is, he is the suffering form of Primal Man.  This original and profound interpretation of the figure of Christ was an important article of the Manichaean creed and is known as the doctrine of the Jesus patibilis, the „passible Jesus“ who „hangs from every tree,“ „is served up bound in every dish,“ „every day is born, suffers, and dies.“ He is dispersed in all creation, but his most genuine realm and embodiment seems to be the vegetable world, that is, the most passive and the only innocent form of life.  Yet at the same time with the active aspect of his nature he is transmundane Nous who, coming from above, liberates this captive substance and continually until the end of the world collects it, i.e., himself, out of the physical dispersal.  (Hans Jonas, The Gnostic Religion – The Message of the Alien God and the Beginnings of Christianity, Second Edition, revised, Beacon Press, Boston, 1963, pp. 228-229)

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