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The Stratfordian as The Grave’s Living Monument

© Gunnar Tómasson

8 February 2018

Prologue

Platonic Construction of Saga-Shakespeare Myth

The astronomy of Plato is based on the two principles of the same and the other, which God combined in the creation of the world. The soul, which is compounded of the same, the other, and the essence, is diffused from the centre to the circumference of the heavens. We speak of a soul of the universe; but more truly regarded, the universe of the Timaeus is a soul, governed by mind, and holding in solution a residuum of matter or evil, which the author of the world is unable to expel, and of which Plato cannot tell us the origin. The creation, in Plato’s sense, is really the creation of order; and the first step in giving order is the division of the heavens into an inner and outer circle of the other and the same, of the divisible and the indivisible, answering to the two spheres, of the planets and of the world beyond them, all together moving around the earth, which is their centre.

Three Parts of Man‘s Soul

The soul of man is divided by [Plato] into three parts […] First, there is the immortal nature of which the brain is the seat, and which is akin to the soul of the universe. This alone thinks and knows and is the ruler of the whole. Secondly, there is the higher mortal soul which, though liable to perturbations of her own, takes the side of reason against the lower appetites. The seat of this is the heart, in which courage, anger, and all the nobler affections are supposed to reside. There the veins all meet; it is their centre or house of guard whence they carry the orders of the thinking being to the extremities of his kingdom. There is also a third or appetitive soul, which receives the commands of the immortal part, not immediately but mediately, through the liver, which reflects on its surface the admonitions and threats of the reason.

http://www.lundyisleofavalon.co.uk/texts/timaeus/plato%20timaeus5.htm

Working Hypothesis

Three Parts of the Soul = Three Values of π

3.141 5926 = Mathematical π

3.142 8571 = 22/7

3.160 4938 = 256/81

Definitions

The Same = 28878

3141 + 5926 + 3142 + 8571 + 3160 + 4938 = 28878

The Other = 20886

1413 + 6295 + 2413 + 1758 + 0613 + 8394 = 20886

 

Summary

1. At Birth, The Same aspect of Man‘s Soul

“is“ Crucified Light of the World

57540

A

16777 = THIS IS IESVS THE KING OF THE IEWES – Matt. 27:37

9442 = THE KING OF THE IEWES – Mark 15:26

13383 = THIS IS THE KING OF THE IEWES – Luke 23:38

17938 = IESVS OF NAZARETH, THE KING OF THE IEWES – John 19:19

57540

2. The Stratfordian on the Stage of The Globe

“is“ The Grave‘s Living Monument

57540

B

28878 = The Same

Murder

 -7000 = Microcosmos – Man in God‘s Image

Baptismal Record

17252 = Gulielmus filius Johannes Shakspere

2602 = 26 April – 2nd month old-style

1564 = 1564 A.D.

Burial Record

10026 = Will Shakspere, gent.

2502 = 25 April

1616 = 1616 A.D.

FINIS

   100 = The End

57540

3. At The End, Christ Raises The Other‘s “Dead“ Self

– And Knowledge is Increased

57540

20886 = The Other

-1000 = Darkness

Cosmic Time

25920 = Platonic Great Year

Transformation

-6960 = Jarðlig skilning – Earthly Understanding

5596 = Andlig spekðin – Spiritual Wisdom

Brave New World – ´Tis new to thee

Old Stratfordian Dead and Buried

  7000 = Microcosmos – Man in God’s Image

Crucified Light of the World

(John 19:30, KJB 1611)

  6098 = It is finished.

57540

***

I. This Graue Shall Haue A Liuing Monument

(Hamlet, Act V, Sc. i. First Folio)

1526160

14795 = Enter King, Queene, Laertes, and a Coffin,                                             

11234 = with Lords attendant.

Hamlet

25211 = The Queene, the Courtiers.  Who is that they follow,

20464 = And with such maimed rites?  This doth betoken,

21359 = The Coarse they follow, did with disperate hand,

18183 = Fore do it own life; ‘twas some Estate.

11265 = Couch we a while, and mark.

Laertes

9245 = What Cerimony else?

Hamlet

17308 = That is Laertes, a very Noble youth: Marke.

Laertes

9245 = What Cerimony else?

Priest

15468 = Her Obsequies haue bin as farre inlarg’d,

22452 = As we haue warrantis, her death was doubtfull,

20987 = And but that great Command, o’re-swaies the order,

19234 = She should in ground vnsanctified haue lodg’d,

20153 = Till the last Trumpet.  For charitable praier,

22950 = Shardes, Flints, and Peebles, should be throwne on her:

18602 = Yet heere she is allowed her Virgin Rites,

19186 = Her Maiden strewments, and the bringing home

6556 = Of Bell and Buriall.

Laertes

11392 = Must there no more be done?

Priest

5506 = No more be done:

18575 = We should prophane the seruice of the dead,

18696 = To sing sage Requiem, and such rest to her

11299 = As to peace-parted Soules.

Laertes

6572 = Lay her i’th’earth,

15782 = And from her faire and vnpolluted flesh,

22455 = May Violets spring.  I tell thee (churlish Priest)

16049 = A Ministring Angell shall my Sister be,

13712 = When thou liest howling?

Hamlet

9578 = What, the faire Ophelia?

Queene

16893 = Sweets to the sweet farewell.

20787 = I hop’d thou should’st haue bin my Hamlets wife:

19986 = I thought thy Bride-bed to haue deckt (sweet Maid)

14679 = And not t’haue strew’d thy Graue.

Laertes

8709 = Oh terrible woer,

17030 = Fall ten times trebble, on that cursed head

20799 = Whose wicked deed, thy most Ingenious sence

16703 = Depriu’d thee of.  Hold off the earth a while,

18402 = Till I haue caught her once more in mine armes:

7301 = Leaps in the graue.

20091 = Now pile your dust, vpon the quicke and dead,

17445 = Till of this flat a Mountaine you haue made,

17393 = To o’re top old Pelion, or the skyish head

8350 = Of blew Olympus.

Hamlet

12461 = What is he, whose griefes

23629 = Beares such an Emphasis?  whose phrase of Sorrow

23001 = Coniure the wandring Starres, and makes them stand

18570 = Like wonder-wounded hearers?  This is I,

5268 = Hamlet the Dane.

Laertes

10996 = The deuill take thy soule.

Hamlet           

12015 = Thou prai’st not well,

18106 = I prythee take thy fingers from my throat;

17682 = Sir though I am not Spleenatiue, and rash,

15081 = Yet haue I something in me dangerous,

20238= Which let thy wisenesse feare.  Away thy hand.

King

8864 = Pluck them asunder.

Queene

5292 = Hamlet, Hamlet.

Gen.

8686 = Good my Lord be quiet.

Hamlet

22215 = Why I will fight with him vppon this Theme.

17735 = Vntill my eielids will no longer wag.

Queene

10565 = Oh my Sonne, what Theame?

Hamlet

18566 = I lou’d Ophelia; fortie thousand Brothers

20789 = Could not (with all there quantitie of Loue)

21052 = Make vp my summe.  What wilt thou do for her?

King

7474 = Oh he is mad Laertes.

Queene

10837 = For loue of God forbeare him.

Hamlet

15197 = Come show me what thou’lt doe.

24160 = Woo’t weepe?  Woo’t fight?  Woo’t teare thy selfe?

16717 = Woo’t drinke vp Esile, eate a Crocodile?

18076 = Ile doo’t.  Dost thou come heere to whine;

17164 = To outface me with leaping in her Graue?

17604 = Be buried quicke with her, and so will I.

22394 = And if thou prate of Mountaines;  let them throw

19346 = Millions of Akers on vs; till our ground

18499 = Sindging his pate against the burning Zone,

18930 = Make Ossa like a wart.  Nay, and thoul’t mouth,

11523 = Ile rant as well as thou.

King

9645 = This is meere Madnesse:

20634 = And thus a while the fit will worke on him:

13082 = Anon as patient as the female Doue,

19336 = When that her golden Cuplet are disclos’d;

14939 = His silence will sit drooping.

Hamlet

5902 = Heare you Sir:

19681 = What is the reason that you vse me thus?

16419 = I loud you euer; but it is no matter:

15617 = Let Hercules himselfe doe what he may.

21572 = The Cat will Mew and Dogge will haue his day.  Exit.

King

17792 = I pray you good Horatio wait vpon him,

25074 = Strengthen your patience to our last nights speech,

20812 = Wee’l put the matter to the present push:

22917 = Good Gertrude set some watch ouer your Sonne,

17247 = This Graue shall haue a liuing Monument:

18352 = An houre of quiet shortly shall we see;

20326 = Till then, in patience our proceeding be.                         Exeunt.                       

1526160

II + III + IV = 948513 + 526846 + 50801 = 1526160

V + VI + VII = 954839 + 103099 + 468222 = 1526160

II. A New Play by William Shakespeare

 (Troilus and Cressida, 2nd Preface, 1609)

948513

16240 = Eternall reader, you have heere a new play,

13010 = never stal’d with the Stage,

23708 = never clapper-clawd with the palmes of the vulger,

16660 = and yet passing full of the palme comicall;

13201 = for it is a birth of your braine,

21808 = that never undertooke any thing commicall, vainely:

17249 = And were but the vaine names of commedies

25742 = changde for the titles of Commodities, or of Playes for Pleas;

17692 = you should see all those grand censors,

17625 = that now stile them such vanities,

21808 = flock to them for the maine grace of their gravities:

15928 = especially this authors Commedies,

11471 = that are so fram’d to the life,

17105 = that they serve for the most common

20281 = Commentaries of all the actions of our lives,

23403 = shewing such a dexteritie and power of witte,

30902 = that the most displeased with Playes, are pleasd with his Commedies.

21167 = And all such dull and heavy-witted worldlings,

20251 = as were never capable of the witte of a Commedie,

23426 = I by report of them to his representations,

13582 = have found that witte there

16494 = that they never found in themselves,

19072 = and have parted better-wittied then they came:

16531 = feeling an edge of witte set upon them,

22250 = more then ever they dreamd they had braine to grinde it on.

18999 = So much and such savored salt of witte

27095 = is in his Commedies, that they seeme (for their height of pleasure)

21928 = to be borne in that sea that brought forth Venus.

22553 = Amongst all there is none more witty then this:

16867 = And had I time I would comment upon it,

29490 = though I know it needs not, (for so much as will make you thinke

28055 = your testerne well bestowd) but for so much worth,

18241 = as even poore I know to be stuft in it.

11685 = It deserves such a labour,

22731 = as well as the best Commedy in Terence or Plautus.

15269 = And beleeve this, That when hee is gone,

24766 = and his Commedies out of sale, you will scramble for them,

17673 = and set up a new English Inquisition.

30450 = Take this for a warning, and at the perrill of your pleasures losse,

11736 = and Judgements, refuse not,

19867 = nor like this the lesse for not being sullied,

18871 = with the smoaky breath of the multitude;

24849 = but thanke fortune for the scape it hath made amongst you.

21313 = Since by the grand possessors wills, I beleeve,

22266 = you should have prayd for them rather then beene prayd.

14729 = And so I leave all such to bee prayd for

30720 = (for the states of their wits healths) that will not praise it.

 1754 = Vale.

948513

III. Francis Bacon‘s Last Letter/Dying Voice

(Easter Morning, 1626)

526846

14285 = To the Earle of Arundel and Surrey.

7470 = My very good Lord:

27393 = I was likely to have had the fortune of Caius Plinius the Elder,

19392 = who lost his life by trying an experiment

21445 = about the burning of the mountain Vesuvius.

27312 = For I was also desirous to try an experiment or two,

23426 = touching the conservation and induration of bodies.

27127 = As for the experiment itself, it succeeded excellently well;

19881 = but in the journey between London and Highgate,

18137 = I was taken with such a fit of casting,

20866 = as I knew not whether it were the stone,

24599 = or some surfeit of cold, or indeed a touch of them all three.

19809 = But when I came to your Lordship’s house,

20992 = I was not able to go back, and therefore was forced

10541 = to take up my lodging here,

27187 = where your housekeeper is very careful and diligent about me;

10692 = which I assure myself

24956 = your Lordship will not only pardon towards him,

14898 = but think the better of him for it.

21030 = For indeed your Lordship’s house is happy to me;

18831 = and I kiss your noble hands for the welcome

15120 = which I am sure you give me to it.

30197 = I know how unfit it is for me to write to your lordship

15772 = with any other hand than mine own;

32508 = but in troth my fingers are so disjointed with this fit of sickness,

12980 = that I cannot steadily hold a pen…

526826

IV. Fiat Lux – Let there be light

(Construction G. T.)

50801

A

Fiat Lux

Alpha

      1 = Monad

4177 = Fiat Lux

11445 = The time is out of yoint. (Hamlet, Act I, Sc. v.)

Omega

The Longest Word

14034 = honorificabilitudinitatibus

Marlowe – Stratfordian

14144 = Quod me nutrit me destruit.*

Man in God’s Image

7000 = Microcosmos

50801

* Will Shakspere gent, 25 April, 1616, as in

10026 + 2502 + 1616 = 14144

B

50801

Let there be  light.

Alpha

 7128 = Let there be light.

Venus and Adonis

(Ovid, Amores)

20165 = Vilia miretur vulgus; mihi flavus Apollo
16408 = Pocula Castalia plena ministret aqua.*

Omega
Man in God’s Image

 7000 = Microcosmos

FINIS

  100 = The End

50801

* Christopher Marlowe transl.:

Let base conceited wits admire vile things;

Fair Phoebus lead me to the Muses’ springs.

V. The Cat will Mew and Dogge will haue his day:

Pish for thee, Island dogge: thou prickeard cur of Island.

(Henry V, Act II, Sc. i – First Folio)

954839

 18650 = Enter Corporall Nym, and Lieutenant Bardolfe.

Bardolfe

11538 = Well met Corporall Nym.

Nym

15575 = Good morrow Lieutenant Bardolfe.

Bardolfe

20149 = What, are Ancient Pistoll and you friends yet?

Nym

14707 = For my part, I care not: I say little:

21416 = but when time shall serue, there shall be smiles,

10337 = but that shall be as it may.

25202 = I dare not fight, but I will winke and holde out mine yron:

16344 = it is a simple one, but what though?

21118 = It will toste Cheese, and it will endure cold,

20533 = as another mans sword will: and there‘s an end.

Bardolfe

21000 = I will bestow a breakfast to make you friendes,

21875 = and wee‘l bee all three sworne brothers to France:

13059 = Let‘t be so good Corporall Nym.

Nym

24719 = Faith, I will liue so long as I may, that‘s the certaine of it:

21189 = and when I cannot liue any longer, I will doe as I may:

20412 = That is my rest, that is the rendeuous of it.

Bardolfe

26274 = It is certaine, Corporall, that he is marryed, to Nell Quickly,

13966 = and certainly she did you wrong,

16922 = for you were troth-plight to her.

Nym

22102 = I cannot tell. Things must be as they may: men may sleepe,

23129 = and they may haue their throats about them at that time,

11631 = and some say, kniues haue edges:

19997 = It must be as it may, though patience be a tyred name,

22416 = yet shee will plodde, there must be Conclusions,

8961 = well, I cannot tell.

11335 = Enter Pistoll, & Quickly.

Bardolfe

17887 = Heere comes Ancient Pistoll and his wife:

13094 = good Corporall be patient heere.

15576 = How now mine Hoaste Pistoll?

Pistoll

13172 = Base Tyke, cal‘st thou mee Hoste,

20417 = now by this hand I sweare I scorne the terme:

11918 = nor shall my Nel keep Lodgers.

Hostess

10650 = No by my troth, not long:

21060 = For we cannot lodge and board a dozen or fourteene

27375 = Gentlewomen that liue honestly by the pricke of their Needles,

26394 = but it will bee thought we keepe a Bawdy-house straight.

16405 = O welliday Lady, if he be not hewne now,

24988 = we shall see wilful adultery and murther committed.

Bardolfe

21809 = Good Lieutenant, good Corporal offer nothing heere.

Nym

2380 = Pish.

Pistoll

23294 = Pish for thee, Island dogge: thou prickeard cur of Island.

Hostess

29119 = Good Corporall Nym shew thy valor, and put vp your sword.

Nym

21631 = Will you shogge off?  I would haue you solus.

Pistoll

15844 = Solus, egregious dog?  O Viper vile;

18253 = The solus in thy most meruailous face,

18417 = the solus in thy teeth, and in thy throate,

19009 = and in thy hatefull Lungs, yea in thy Maw perdy;

23119 = and which is worse, within thy nastie mouth.

23093 = I do retort the solus in thy bowels, for I can take,

24963 = and Pistols cocke is vp, and flashing fire will follow.

954839 

Background

The only mention of Iceland – Island – in the First Folio is found in the above line from a rowdy whorehouse scene in Henry V. And, as it happens, the Cipher Values of Tun Thin and James S. Duesenberry – former Harvard classmates – who triggered events that eventually caught tens of senior IMF, Harvard and U.S. and Iceland Government officials, in a moral dilemma appear as the fatal bait neatly lined up between the Cipher Values of The Mouse-trap and Island:

Pish for thee, Island dogge: thou prickeard cur of Island.

23294

7302 = The Mouse-trap

4734 = Tun Thin

8566 = James S. Duesenberry

  2692 = Island

23294

***

VI. The Whorehouse Rock

(Construction G. T.)

103099

23294 = Pish for thee, Island dogge: thou prickeard cur of Island.

13031 = International Monetary Fund

8566 = James S. Duesenberry

9948 = Harvard University

Whorehouse kicks

11587 = Character Assassination

5881 = Níðingsverk – Barbarity

7750 = Psychiatric Rape

6603 = Mannorðsmorð – Vicious Slander

16439 = Criminal Obstruction of Justice

103099

VII. Abomination of Desolation¹

(Contemporary history)

468222

The Gates of Hell

13031 = International Monetary Fund

9948 = Harvard University

7146 = Seðlabanki Íslands – Central Bank of Iceland = 30125

Right Measure of Man

Persecuted

  8525 = Gunnar Tómasson

12385 = Guðrún Ólafía Jónsdóttir

Modes of Persecution

11587 = Character Assassination

5881 = Níðingsverk – Barbarity

7750 = Psychiatric Rape

6603 = Mannorðsmorð – Vicious Slander

16439 = Criminal Obstruction of Justice

Persecutors – Jesting Pilates

U.S. Government

12867 = William Jefferson Clinton – President

4496 = Janet Reno – Attorney General

International Monetary Fund

8899 = Jacques de Larosière – Managing Director

7678 = Michel Camdessus – Managing Director

5517 = William B. Dale – Deputy Managing Director

2713 = Dick Erb – Deputy Managing Director

6584 = Jacques J. Polak – Economic Counsellor

4734 = Tun Thin – Asian Department Director

9349 = W. John R. Woodley – Asian Department Deputy Director

3542 = Ken Clark – Director of Administration

3339 = Graeme Rea – Director of Administration

3227 = P. N. Kaul – Deputy Director of Administration

5446 = Nick Zumas – Grievance Committee Chairman

Harvard University

3625 = Derek C. Bok – President

8175 = Henry Rosovsky – Dean, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

8566 = James S. Duesenberry – Chairman, Department of Economics

11121 = Paul Anthony Samuelson – Ph. D., Nobel Laureate in Economics

8381 = Walter S. Salant – Ph. D., Brookings Institution Senior Fellow

Iceland Government

10244 = Vigdís Finnbogadóttir – President

11361 = Salóme Þorkelsdóttir – Althing President

6028 = Davíd Oddsson – Prime Minister

10295 = Þorsteinn Pálsson – Minister of Justice

8316 = Jón Sigurdsson – Minister of Commerce

5940 = Jónas H. Haralz – World Bank Executive Director

Other Iceland

6648 = Jóhannes Nordal – Central Bank Governor

8864 = Bjarni Bragi Jónsson – Central Bank Chief Economist

14314 = Benjamín Jón Hafsteinn Eiríksson – Harvard Ph. D.

9720 = Matthías Jóhannessen – Editor, Morgunblaðið

Other

10989 = Orenthal James Simpson

8015 = John & Patsy Ramsey

4953 = Osama bin Laden

Violent Crimes

3586 = Murder

 

6899 = Nicole Brown

4948 = Ron Goldman

6100 = Brentwood

1204 = 12 June (4th month old-style)

1994 = 1994 A.D.

 

3718 = Jonbenet

3503 = Boulder

2510 = 25 December (10th month old-style)

1996 = 1996 A.D.

 

5557 = The Pentagon

9596 = World Trade Center

1107 = 11 September (7th month old-style)

2001 = 2001 A.D.

Other

7920 = Excelsior Hotel

5060 = Paula Jones

803 = 8 May (3rd month old-style)

1991 = 1991 A.D.

4014 = Kiss it!

 

8486 = The White House

7334 = Kathleen Willey

2909 = 29 November (9th month old-style)

1993 = 1993 A.D.

22091 = I’ve wanted to do this ever since I laid eyes on you.

 

6045 = The Oval Office

8112 = Monica Lewinsky

1509 = 15 November (9th month old-style)

1995 = 1995 A.D.  = 438097¹

468222

VIII. The Mouse-trap

(Hamlet, Act III, Sc. ii. First folio.)

515600

 7583 = Enter Lucianus.

Hamlet

19072 = This is one Lucianus nephew to the King.

Ophelia

12427 = You are a good Chorus, my Lord.

Hamlet

21348 = I could interpret betweene you and your loue:

14896 = if I could see the Puppets dallying.

Ophelia

12893 = You are keene my Lord, you are keene.

Hamlet

20845 = It would cost you a groaning, to take off my edge.

Ophelia

11861 = Still better and worse.

Hamlet

11226 = So you mistake Husbands.

19156 = Begin Murderer.  Pox, leaue thy damnable Faces, and begin.

21025 = Come, the croaking Rauen doth bellow for Reuenge.

Lucianus

11065 = Thoughts blacke, hands apt,

11381 = Drugges fit, and Time agreeing:

18259 = Confederate season, else, no Creature seeing:

22354 = Thou mixture ranke, of Midnight Weeds collected,

20066 = With Hecats ban, thrice blasted, thrice infected,

16669 = Thy naturall Magicke, and dire propertie,

17501 = On wholsome life, vsurpe immediately.

 

15543 = Powres the poyson in his eares.

Hamlet

16634 = He poysons him i’th Garden for’s estate:

7711 = His name’s Gonzago:

21814 = the Story is extant and writ in choyce Italian.

7610 = You shall see anon

24793 = how the Murtherer gets the loue of Gonzago’s wife.

Ophelia

6561 = The King rises.

Hamlet

14245 = What, frighted with false fire.

Queene

8414 = How fares my Lord?

Polonius

6848 = Giue o’re the Play.

King

10045 = Giue me some Light.  Away.

All

14262 = Lights, Lights, Lights.                       Exeunt.

 

8919 = Manet Hamlet & Horatio.

Hamlet

17145 = Why let the strucken Deere go weepe,

8782 = The Hart vngalled play:

22955 = For some must watch, while some must sleepe;

13692 = So runnes the world away.

515600

IX. Some must watch, while some must sleepe;

So runnes the world away.

(Construction G. T.)

515600

Venus and Adonis

(Ovid, Amores)

20165 = Vilia miretur vulgus; mihi flavus Apollo
16408 = Pocula Castalia plena ministret aqua.*

Base Conceited Wits at Play

468222 = Abomination of Desolation

Herald of New World

10805 = Sweet Swan of Avon

515600

* Christopher Marlowe transl.:

Let base conceited wits admire vile things;

Fair Phoebus lead me to the Muses’ springs.

***

Calculator for converting letters to cipher values is at:

http://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphersaga.htm

¹Abomination of Desolation

Message posted to friends on 26 February 2014:

While in Iceland last August, I met with Pétur Halldórsson at the Cafe Milano in Reykjavík. We discussed matters of mutual interest, including what my Saga Cipher work might “mean“.

I took a napkin and, for emphasis, wrote down the number 438097. This is the Cipher Sum of some three dozen names of persons, institutions, dates and events during the reference period, including two famous murder cases, a sex scandal in high places, and presumptive lies told in connection therewith.

I told Pétur (what I had long surmised) that I believed that this number was associated with a watershed event in human history whose final phase was upon our world.

An earth-shaking culmination of human and spiritual evolution.

 

 

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